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 1Gemischt

Three penguin species of the genus Pygoscelis breed on King George Island and are shown together on the photo (from left to right: Adélie penguin, 2 chinstrap penguins, gentoo penguin). The Polar and Bird Ecology working group observes the population development of these three species for many years. They could show that during the last three decades, the numbers of breeding pairs of gentoo penguins increased, while on the other hand the numbers of breeding pairs of the Adélie and chinstrap penguins clearly decreased.

Picture:Martin Senf, Ökologie,
Friedrich-Schiller-Universität Jena
     
 1Zuegelpinguin

Chinstrap penguins (Pygoscelis antarctica)


Picture:Martin Senf, Ökologie,
Friedrich-Schiller-Universität Jena
     
 Gehegeanlage

Remderoda enclosure site for experiments with small rodents
on the population level. The facility is driven since 2000 by the
Instituteof Ecology and is used for EMS studies (Experimental
Model Systems) to investigate among others the effect of habitat structure on behaviour and population dynamics of voles.
Results contribute to the field of landscape ecology and may
directly be applied to nature conservation.

Picture: Pascal Wiegand, Ökologie,
Friedrich-Schiller-Universität Jena
     
 Haeckel Haus Eingang

The Ernst-Haeckel-House of the Friedrich-Schiller University in Jena is one of the oldest - after the Karl-Sudhoff-Institute in Leipzig (1905/06) - institutes of the history of science in Germany. Both institutes were established by private foundations. The foundation is directly connected to the zoologist Ernst Haeckel (1834 - 1919). The unique profile of the Ernst-Haeckel-House and its dual function - as a museum and a university related institute for the history of science with a connected archive and collection - has historical origins. The institute is located in Haeckel's former home in Berggasse 7 in Jena. Haeckel had this Italian country style house built - in immediate proximity to the new building institute of zoology which was constructed at the same time - for his family and lived there until his death in 1919.

Olaf Breidbach was appointed to a professorship at the department of the history of science of the Friedrich-Schiller University Jena and acted as the director of the institute for the history of medicine, science and technology, the Ernst-Haeckel-House, until his death on July 22nd 2014.

Picture: Dr. Ina Weiß,
Friedrich-Schiller-Universität Jena
     
 Goethehaus Glance towards the inspector house with the Goethe memorial,
at the Botanical Garden of the Friedrich-Schiller-University.
Recorded in Jena on June 10th 2011.
Picture: Anne Günther,
Friedrich-Schiller-Universität Jena
     
 3Botanischer Garten This photo was taken on July 8th 2009. It shows an aerial view
of the Botanical Garden in Jena and has been captured from the
top floor of the JenTower.
Picture: PD Dr. Thomas Hinze, Brandenburgische
Technische Universität Cottbus 
     
 Roetelmaus
The bank vole (Clethrionomys glareolus) and other vole species are part of behavioral investigations at the Remderoda Field Research Station.  The test site is located in Remderoda, a district of Jena. Mainly, scientists of the working group Small Mammal Ecology of the University of Jena perform investigations there. The field of research is behavioural and evolutionary ecology, population dynamics, and landscape ecology.
Picture taken on 10/19/2011.
Picture: Sarah Mitschnik, Ecology,
Friedrich-Schiller-Universität Jena
     
Ae_arabicum Cyp inflorescence005

 

The picture was taken at the structural unit Genetics
and shows a young inflorescence of Aethionema arabic,
Accession Cyprus.
Picture: Structural unit Genetics,
Faculty of Biology and Pharmacy,
Friedrich-Schiller-Universität Jena
     
 Alpenveilchen In the botanical garden you can encounter flowering plants even during wintertime. The photo was taken in February 2015 and shows the open land-cyclamen (Cyclamen coum) Picture: Dr. Ina Weiß,
Friedrich-Schiller-Universität Jena
     
 Eisberge4 This picture of a group of icebergs was taken on one of
the few sunny days on King George Island, Antarctica.
Such icebergs split off again and again from the glaciers
on the Antarctic continent; subsequently winds and ocean
currents take them to the open sea and even to
King George island.
Picture: Jan Esefeld, Ecology,
Friedrich-Schiller-Universität Jena
     
 AntarktisexpeditionJenniferSchmidt The picture was taken on 03/01/2008 during the Antarctic
expedition by scientists of the working group Polar- and
Ornitho-Ecology of the University of Jena. 
Picture: Jennifer Schmidt, Ecology,
Friedrich-Schiller-Universität Jena
     
 Axolotl
Today the Mexican axolotl is critically endangered in its natural habitat in lakes around Mexico City, but thrives in research laboratories around the world, where it is used for research on development, regeneration, and evolution. Here, we concentrate on the early history of the axolotl as a laboratory animal to celebrate that the first living axolotls arrived in Paris in 1864, 150 years ago. Maybe surprisingly, at first the axolotl was distributed across Europe without being tied to specific research questions, and amateurs engaged in acclimatization and aquarium movements played an important role for the rapid proliferation of the axolotl across the continent. But the aquarium also became an important part of the newly established laboratory, where more and more biological and medical research now took place. Early scientific interest focused on the anatomical peculiarities of the axolotl, its rare metamorphosis, and whether it was a larva or an adult. Later, axolotl data was used to argue both for (by August Weismann and others) and against (by e.g., Albert von Kölliker) Darwinism, and the axolotl even had a brief history as a laboratory animal used in a failed attempt to prove Lysenkoism in Jena, Germany. Nowadays, technical developments such as transgenic lines, and the very strong interest in stem cell and regeneration research has again catapulted the axolotl into becoming an important laboratory animal. J. Exp. Zool. (Mol. Dev. Evol.) 9999B: XX-XX, 2015. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
Picture : Jan-Peter Kasper,
Friedrich-Schiller-UniversitätU Jena
     
 Bakterien_ auf_Pilzhyphen The picture shows the attachment of bacteria to the fungal hyphae.
For details see: Selected Publications of the Faculty in 2014
       
Picture: F. Blei und A.T. Kovacs
     
Baobab_BurkinaFaso  Flowers and young fruits of the baobab tree (Adansonia digitata),
an eye-catching tree in West African savanna ecosystems.
It is used by the local population in manifold ways. To unravel
the effects of different land-use systems on the occurrence of
savanna trees, is part of the research at the Institute of Ecology.
Picture taken on 10/09/2012 in Burkina Faso.
Picture: Markus Bernhardt-Römermann,
Ecology, Friedrich-Schiller-Universität Jena
     
 fistulina_hepaticaSchultzeWege

Johanna Schultze-Wege (1844-1918) was a pioneer in the field of mushroom research in Thuringia. Her extensive and wide-ranging mycological work, remained largely unknown to the general public - a fate shared with many scientifically engaged women in 1900.

In order for these - from the perspective of mycology valuable - works not to fall into oblivion and to allow access to important parts of the original material, the watercolors and dried fungi ("Exiskkate") were digitized using the support of the ThULB Jena and the German Research Foundation (DFG) and added to the historical collections of the Universal Multimedia Electronic Library (UrMEL) and thus portrays the legacy of this scholar woman.
Pictures from Johanna Schultze-Wege

Vita Johanna Schultze-Wege (1844-1918)
Formula "Champignonbrod"

Exhibition "Pilze-ein Leben im Verborgenen"
(7.10.2010- 11.2.2011, Jena)
     
 Fibroblasts_nucleus_ERGIC_grau250
Researchers unraveled a novel regulatory mechanism that links
lipid biosynthesis with cancer-relevant signaling pathways and the
morphology of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER).
The fluorescence microscopy image shows the nucleus (blue) and
the ER/Golgi intermediate compartment (red) of mouse fibroblasts
upon ER stress. 
Picture: Dr. Andreas Koeberle,Department of 
Pharmaceutical and Medicinal Chemistry,
Friedrich-Schiller-Universität Jena
     
 Frosch Tiny Hyperolius mitchelli from the kind of Hyperoliidae on the hand
of Dr. Hendrik Müller at the Institute of Zoology of the University of
Jena, taken on April 11th 2013.
Picture : Jan-Peter Kasper,
Friedrich-Schiller-Universität Jena
     
 Gewaechshaus Greenhouses at the Botanical Garden of the University of Jena,
added on 10/05/2012.
Picture: Anne Günther,
Friedrich-Schiller-Universität Jena
     
 Haeckel On this recording Ernst Haeckel is shown during the winter of
1903/04 with a sketchbook at the beach in Rapallo.
Picture: Dr. Thomas Bach,
Ernst-Haeckel-Haus Jena
     
 Haeckelbuecher Books of the zoologist Ernst Haeckel, shown at his original
study room on 13/02/2009 in the Ernst-Haeckel-Haus at
Friedrich-Schiller-University Jena. The naturalist Heackel,
which is often referred to as the "German Darwin ', called
his house in the Jena Berggasse "Villa Medusa" because
during the construction phase of the house he drew up his
medusae monograph. Today the Institute of the History of
Medicine and Natural Sciences of the University of Jena is
located in the Ernst-Haeckel-Haus.  Ernst Haeckel was born
in Potsdam 175 years ago on February 16th, 1834;
he died on August 9th, 1919 in Jena.
The usage of the picture us only
permitted for publications of the
University of Jena.

Picture: Jan-Peter Kasper,
Friedrich-Schiller-Universität Jena
     
 HerbariumHausknecht The historical herbarium at the library of the Herbarium
Haussknecht of the Friedrich-Schiller-University Jena, was
added on 11/11/2010. It is the largest facility of its kind
in Germany and was just added to the Consortium of German
Natural History Research Collections (DNFS).
With more than three million documents of dried plants and
a library with approximately 170,000 bibliographic units along
with the extensive archive, the Herbarium Hausknecht of the
University of Jena belongs to the 20 largest herbariums
worldwide.
Picture: Jan-Peter Kasper,
Friedrich-Schiller-Universität Jena
     
 HerbariumTulipa

Both tulips (on the left side: Tulipa aleppensis Boiss. ex Regel, on the right side: Tulipa biflora Pall. var. major Boiss.) were collected by Carl Haussknecht (1838-1903) during his voyages through Southwest Asia. During 1865 and 1869, Haussknecht travelled through different parts of Turkey, Iran, Iraq, and Syria. He was sent by the important swiss botanist Edmond Boissier (1810-1885) to collect plants in still underexplored regions. Haussknecht's plant gatherings formed the basis of the Herbarium Haussknecht, founded by himself in Weimar in 1896, now being part of the Friedrich Schiller University and since 1950 housed in the main building of the Jena University. In the meantime, the collection comprises about 3,6 million specimens, including higher plants as well as algae, fungi, lichens, and mosses. They represent an integral element for numerous research topics within e.g., systematic botany, plant geography, plant conservation, ecology, biodiversity, nature protection and furthermore in history of science.

For visits or guided tours please contact the curator of the herbarium.


 

Contact information: Dr. Jörn Hentschel

Mail:

Phone: +49(0)3641 9-49280
Fax: +49(0)3641 9-49282

http://www.spezbot.uni-jena.de/herbarium/

Friedrich-Schiller-Universität
Herbarium Haussknecht (JE)
Fürstengraben 1
07737 Jena
Germany


 


     
 HUPETER_Eselping The Gentoo Penguin belongs to the genus Pygoscelis and
is most closely related to the Adelie Penguin and the Chinstrap
Penguin. At the Russian research station Bellingshausen scientists
from the working group Polar and Ornitho-ecology of the FSU Jena
work on a number of different research programs since 1983.
In 2013 the 25th Antarctic expedition of Jena researchers has already
taken place
(see:http://www.uni-jena.de/Mitteilungen/PM131125_Antarktis.html).
Picture: Dr. Hans-Ulrich Peter, Ökologie,
Friedrich-Schiller-Universität Jena
     
 HyphenZygomycetenLichtheimia_corymbifera In this picture hyphae of Zygomycetes Lichtheimia corymbifera are
shown. The photo was provided by Dr. Kerstin Voigt
(Jena Microbial Resource Collection:  Jena Microbial Resource Collection).
Picture: Volker U. Schwartze,
Friedrich-Schiller-Universität Jena
     
 Insekten

The composite image of individually photographed insects from the
Phyletic Museum in Jena shows a small fraction of their immense
diversity. Scientists at the 1KITE project used a data set of 1478
genes from 144 species of insects to elucidate and date their
phylogenetic development

Original publication:
Bernhard Misof et al.
Phylogenomics resolves the timing and pattern of insect evolution.
Science 2014,  346 (6210), 763-767
DOI: 10.1126/science.1257570

Picture: Dr. Hans Pohl,
Friedrich-Schiller-Universität Jena
     
 JenaExperimenScherber Experimental field site of the Jena Experiment, which is located in
Jena since 2002. On experimental grasland plots the effects of plant
diversity on producers, consumers, nutrient cycles and processes are
observed, as well as the underlying mechanisms.
Picture: Jena-Experiment, Ecology,
Friedrich-Schiller-Universität Jena
     
JenaExperimentEbeling Trophic interactions on a very small scale, observed on the field site of
the Jena Experiment. You see here the interplay of a pollinator and its
predator on a flower of Knautia arvensis.
Picture: Anne Ebeling, Ecology,
Friedrich-Schiller-Universität Jena
     
 KakteenBotGarten The recording was made on 21.5.2011 at the Botanical gardens in Jena.
The Golden Barrel Cactus (Echinocactus grusonii) is also known as
"mother-in-law-chair".
Picture: PD Dr. Thomas Hinze, Brandenburg
Technical University Cottbus
     
 Lepidium appelianum The picture was taken at the structural unit Genetics and shows an
inflorescence of Lepidium appelianum when attempting the
manual pollination.
Picture : Structural unit Genetics,
Friedrich-Schiller-Universität Jena
     
 LichtheimiaOriginal The fungus Lichtheimia corymbifera forms its spores in sporangia,
which have their origin in a wide-branched hyphae. The fungus is
dangerous only when it infects a person with a weakened immune system.
For details see: Selected Publications of the Faculty in 2014
 
Picture: The photo was provided by
Dr. Kerstin Voigt
(
Jena Microbial Resource Collection:
 Jena Microbial Resource Collection).
     
 NasoniaWespen These Nasonia wasps are not more than two millimeters in size,
and were examined on Wednesday (13.01.2010) under a microscope
at the Institute of General Zoology and Animal Physiology of the University of Jena.
In an international research project involving scientists from Jena,
the complete genome of this wasp has been decrypted. The results were published
on 15.01.2010 in the journal "Science". 
Nasonia wasps are parasitic insects that infect fly pupae and thereby eliminate
an agricultural pest in a natural fashion.
The usage of the picture us only permitted for
publications of the University of Jena.
Picture: Jan-Peter Kasper,
Friedrich-Schiller-Universität Jena
     
 Pilzkulturen Here the diversity of fungi in culture is shown.


Picture: Jan-Peter Kasper,
Friedrich-Schiller-Universität Jena
     
 Orobates

Just over 300 million years ago a reptile about a meter long crawled in today's Thuringian Forest on loamy soil. The early saurians Orobates pabsti left deep marks that petrified gradually. In addition to the tracks long known, a skeleton of the lizard amazingly well preserved was found on the Bromacker in Tambach-Dietharz in 1998.

 

The goal is to build a biomimetic robot that moves just like Orobates pabsti.
Ursaurier Orobates pabsti
© Donation Castle Friedenstein Gotha
 
     
 Piranhas Only temporarily for a few minutes a piranha of the
Botanic Garden of the University of Jena
swims in a small aquarium on 11/01/2011.
Due to the scheduled cleaning procedure, the pond at the Victoria house was drained,
the fish from South America were "evicted" for the time.
The founding of the Botanical Garden near the main university building dates back to
the year 1794, when Duke Carl August of Saxe-Weimar
gave permission for the establishment of the garden.
Picture: Jan-Peter Kasper,
Friedrich-Schiller-Universität Jena
     
 Rapsfeld Locally grown rapeseed protein can replace soy protein in food.

Excerpt from the press release:

Furthermore, additional sources of protein for human consumption must be harnessed.
An important role here, as Jena nutritionists state, could play rape plants.
Jahreis and his team have now investigated the rape plant as a whole on their potential
for human consumption. You have the world's first study on the utilization of rapeseed
protein carried out in humans, the results have been published in a prestigious
international journal (Clinical Nutrition).
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.clnu.2012.11.005
Picture: Anne Günther,
Friedrich-Schiller-Universität
Press release:
http://idw-online.de/de/news516676
     
 Schleiden

Matthias Jacob Schleiden (5.4.1804-23-6-1881) was a Professor of Botany in Jena from 1846 to 1863 and from 1850 to 1863 Director of the Botanical Garden in Jena. He was known as one of the founders of cell theory, as the author of "Fundamentals of scientific botany" and popular science journals. He prompted Carl Zeiss to establish optical workshops and build microscopes in Jena. These microscopes were tested in academic classes, setting the starting point of the fruitful cooperation between the university and local industry.

 

(The text was taken from the panel located below the monument).
Picture: Dr. Ina Weiß,
Friedrich-Schiller-Universität Jena
     
 Riesenseerose5B The blooming water lily was taken in Jena on 08/21/2014 at the Botanical gardens.
On this day, the Botanical gardens were open to visitors until 10pm.
The flowers open only at the beginning of dusk and close again at dawn. Each flower
opens at exactly two consecutive nights. On the first night the flower is white,
during the second night it usually has more or less pink color.
Picture: Dr. Ina Weiß,
Friedrich-Schiller-UniversitätU Jena
     
 Sabal parviflora The leaves of Sabal parviflora are regarded by two girls on a tour through the tropical
greenhouse of the Botanical Garden of Jena Friedrich Schiller University on 19.9.2000.
The founding of the Botanical Garden near the main university building dates back to the year
1794, when Duke Carl August of Saxe-Weimar gave permission for the establishment of the garden.
Since September 17, a six-day conference of the German Botanical Society and Association for
Applied Botany takes place in Jena, with the participation of more than 1000 botanist that
will talk about research at German universities.
The usage of the picture us only permitted for
publications of the University of Jena

Picture: Jan-Peter Kasper,
Friedrich-Schiller-Universität Jena
     
 Savanne_BurkinaFaso
Unused savanna ecosystems are important reference points to examine
the effects of human land-use. The picture was taken in the context of
a research project of the Institute of Ecology on 11/09/2012 in the
W-National Park in eastern Burkina Faso.
 
Picture: Markus Bernhardt-Römermann,
Ecology, Friedrich-Schiller-Universität Jena
     
 Seerose22August2014 A single flower of a giant water lily lowers its blossoms after the second day and the seeds ripen beneath the water surface. This recording was taken at noon on August 22, 2014. Picture: Dr. Ina Weiß,
Friedrich-Schiller-Universität Jena
     
 SeeroseFSU Blossom of a Santa Cruz giant water lily on 08/21/2014 at the Botanical
Garden of the University of Jena. The blossoms of the water lily open until the beginning of the dusk. By daybreak they close again.
Each flower opens at exactly two consecutive nights.
Picture: Jan-Peter Kasper,
Friedrich-Schiller-Universität Jena
     
 Siedlung_BurkinaFaso Village settlement in southwestern Burkina Faso. The effects of
traditional land-use (shifting cultivation) and the shift to permanent
crop cultures with fertilizer application are part of the research at the
Institute of Ecology. Picture taken on 30/11/2013 in Burkina Faso.
Picture: Markus Bernhardt-Römermann,
Ecology, Friedrich-Schiller-Universität Jena
     
 Skua South Polar Skua with GLS-logger on the right leg.
Excerpt from the press release:
When choosing their winter quarters the Antarctic skuas are flexible. This evidence is shown by a study of an international research team lead by the Polar ornithologist Dr. Hans-Ulrich Peter from the Friedrich-Schiller-University Jena. Accordingly, the large part of the South Polar skuas - belonging to the Stercorariidae, spends the Antarctic winter in the North Atlantic, while about one-third of the animals of the same species hibernate, tens of thousands of kilometers away, in the North Pacific.
To determine the flight paths of the birds, under the leadership of Dr. Peter doctoral student Matthias Kopp has applied data loggers to the South Polar skuas at their breeding areas on King George Iceland, some 120 kilometers off the Antarctic mainland that recorded their position data over several years beginning in 2006.The data was evaluated by Mr. Kopp along with colleagues from Britain and Switzerland.

Picture: Matthias Kopp,
Friedrich-Schiller-Universität Jena

Press release:
http://idw-online.de/de/news454321
     
 Steinhummel
Bombus lapidarius (red-tailed bumble bee) on Knautia arvensis (field scabiosa)
Picture: Anne Ebeling,
Ecology, Friedrich-Schiller-Universität Jena
     
 Tabletten2 Symbolic picture: Several drugs, taken on 25.05.2014 in Gera. Picture: Jan-Peter Kasper,
Friedrich-Schiller-Universität Jena
     
 Totholz_BayerischerWald Unused forests with high structural diversity and significant amounts of dead wood often harbor greater biodiversity than managed forests. Studying the dynamic development of unused forests is a research focus at the Institute of Ecology. Picture taken on 20/10/2012 in the National Park Bavarian Forest. Picture: Markus Bernhardt-Römermann,
Ecology, Friedrich-Schiller-Universität Jena
     
 Wachteln The motion scientists from Jena University had quails walking through a high speed X-ray installation and measured the power at work in their legs.
Picture: Jan-Peter Kasper,
Friedrich-Schiller-Universität Jena

Press release:
http://idw-online.de/de/news617463
     
 Winterschneeball Small ice sculpture on the buds of Viburnum farreri (winter snowball) on the outdoor area of the Botanical Garden of Jena Friedrich Schiller University, added on 13/12/2010. The founding of the Botanical Garden near the main university building dates back to the year 1794, when Duke Carl August of Saxe-Weimar gave permission for the establishment of the garden. Picture: Jan-Peter Kasper,
Friedrich-Schiller-Universität Jena
     
 Wolfspraeparat The habitus preparation of a wolf was shown in 2014 as part of the special exhibition 'Wolf and Wild Cats' at the Medusensaal of the Phyletic Museum (in the picture is also a wildcat to see). The specimen comes from the animal enclosure Chemnitz and was made in 1990 by the taxidermist Matthias Krüger. In such preparations, the habit skin velvet coat is removed and tanned. The skin is then pulled through a custom-made prefabricated model body made of wire and wood wool, so that the object is overall very light. The bones of the animal are kept separately; the eyes are made of glass. Picture: Gunnar Brehm,
Friedrich-Schiller-UniversitätU Jena

Inventory number: Mam 2371
Female, Tiergehege Chemnitz, 1990
Taxidermist: Matthias Krüger
Length ca. 140 cm, Height: ca. 70 cm,
Width ca. 30 cm

Link:www.uni-jena.de/Universität/Einrichtungen/Museen/Archiv+Objekt+des+Monats/2014/Februar+2014.html
     
 Zygospore Scanning electron micrograph of a zygospore of the Zygomycota Zygorhynchus moelleri.

Creative Commons Lizenz 3.0, by-nc-sa,
Friedrich-Schiller-Universität: Sammlungen
der Naturwissenschaften und Naturgeschichte,
"Jena Microbial Resource Collection".
 Date: 16.01.2017


Information on image rights:
Generally the publication of the images has to be in agreement with the right holders of the respective picture (for details check the legal notice).